Every State has the right to establish the width of its territorial sea up to a limit that does not exceed 12 nautical miles from the straight baselines.

Piece of iron or wood, heavy and strong in the shape of a harpoon or hook and that is attached by a rope or chain, serves to hold it to the bottom. It allows the vessel to be firmly grasped at the bottom.

Type of anchor with stocks, with great grip on almost all types of bottoms. Due to the difficulties in handling and stowage, it is hardly used today.

Type of anchor without stocks and multipurpose use. It is less efficient in gripping seaweed bottoms.

Advisable in rivers, streams or areas where the current can change to the opposite direction and the available spaces do not allow the borneo.

On the Danforth design, the reed is a U-shaped rod where the arganeum is transferred to facilitate its release from the bottom.

Its performance is recommended for rocky bottoms, coarse sands, rocky soils. It is highly versatile for all other soils.

Also called anchor plow. Advisable in rivers, streams or areas where the current can change to the opposite direction and the available spaces do not allow the borneo.

Open canvas cone that, dragged by the stern, serves to reduce the speed of the boat and thus prevent it from crossing into the sea.

It can also start from the bow, leaving the boat approaching the sea and drifting at a minimum speed.

Also stern calls. They are the ones used as auxiliaries, they were much smaller than cam anchors and hope anchors and they were stowed on deck or on garrison tables.

This is the name given to the single-arm anchor. It is nailed with hammer blows. It is also used for mooring on the beach.

Cloth cone or other similar subterfuge, thrown into the sea offers resistance to being dragged and is used on ships, with stormy times when it is not possible to ride out.

There are various shapes, but the most widespread is that of resistant canvas, in the shape of a truncated cone, with two openings, the largest of which is equal to one-tenth of the length of the boat and the smallest one-tenth of the largest; the height of the cone one and a half times the largest diameter.